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20130228
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
britain is debating whether to lead the eu, why does turkey want to become a full member of the club? and a man who came close to the european union's first marxist prime minister has increased the political and d in athens. he was nicknamed sexting slc -- secy alexi. we went to see if there really is this problem in greece. please be warned, there is some flash photography. >> greece is a place where economic crisis has given way to social crisis. strikes paralyzing the capital, and now, political violence. somebody fired a kalashnikov. now, the left wing has increase the ante, making accusations about the secret service in the 1970's. in 1969, a bomb in the -- in milan left several dead. it is a state with in a state. a strategy of tension. today, there is the gospel of the present great government. the coalition government brought about last year has stabilized the fiscal situation, but it is politically fragile. this is becoming perhaps the first marxist prime minister. >> a secret strategy of creating violent attention. >> it is not exactly a secret strategy. i think it has been
to provide a voice of the world. last week's european council agreed the overall limit on eu spending for the next seven years, starting in 2014. been agreed in the past, spending has gone up, but last week we agreed that spending should come down. by working with like-minded allies, we delivered a real- terms cut in what brussels can spend for the first time in history. as the house knows, the eu budget is negotiated annually, so what we were negotiating -- initially at the council last november and again last week -- was not the individual annual budgets, but rather the overall framework for the next seven years. this includes the overall ceilings on what can be spent -- effectively, the limit on the european union's credit card for the next seven years. during the last negotiation, which covered the period 2007 to 2013, the last government agreed to an 8% increase in the payments ceiling, to 943 billion. put simply, this gave the eu a credit card with a higher limit, and today we are still living with the results of allowing the eu's big spenders to push for more and more spending
on the show -- after grueling marathon negotiations, the eu agrees on a budget bill that for the first time sees a cut in spending. >> street battles in tunisia following the funeral of the slain opposition leader chokri belaid. >> millions are in asia heading home to celebrate the year of the snake. for the first time in the history of the european union, the long-term budget will be cut. 27 eu leaders meeting in brussels have agreed to a final budget during a second summit arranged especially to do so. we will go live to brussels for the latest in just a moment. >> that's right -- the drastically reduced seven-year budget is worth 959 billion euros and was hammered out after two days of nearly round-the- clock negotiations and is far less than the just over $1 trillion euros -- and the one trillion euros the commission had originally proposed. >> german chancellor angela merkel went into the talks saying she was confident the agreement would be reached. in the end, the 27 member states came up with a compromise that even british prime minister david cameron welcomed as a good deal for bri
a goal for the european union. after years of very little progress, the e appears to -- the eu appears to have an ally in what has. >> president obama announced the start of trade negotiations on a trade deal. brussels said talks could begin before summer. if successful, those negotiations would result in the biggest financial trade deal ever. >> the eu and u.s. already trade some 2 billion euros worth of goods and services every day. about 1/3 of total global commerce. president obama wants to bring that commerce into what would be the world's biggest free trade zone. the european commission says that would have world wide applications. >> which translates into tens of billions of euros every year and tens of thousands of new jobs. this offers us a great perspective at a time when we are gradually making our way to recovery. most important of all, it is a boost to our economies that does not cost 1 cent of taxpayer money. >> both sides stand to benefit. economists to warn that negotiations will be tough. the eu and washington disagree on issues ranging from industrial trade barriers a
'm kelly evans. these are your headlines from around the world. >> eu leaders are nearing a historical deal in brussels which could see the region's spending reduced for the first time. >>> chinese trade going gang bust ner january while inflationary pressures ease off thanks in part to the lunar new year effect. >>> this company must not disappear. that's the french government. it says it may invest in peugeot. >> and the yen says the currency has weakened too much. >>> welcome to the final program of the week. i'm pleased we've got to this day. >> we've had a lot of time together this week. i have. and that's not why i'm pleased we got to this day. >> yeah, yeah. >> strong numbers out of china. >> that's right. we saw a big improvement there. but i have to say frankly, most people's attention whether it's here or on the other side of the pond is the snowstorm. it seems like winds, 50 miles per hour. blizzard conditions in the u.s. we know when there's a storm like that headed for the biggest media market frankly in the world, it's probably all you're going to hear about for a while. >> th
at the new eu agreement to cap bonuses. it is aimed at a re-piece of the financial crisis. >> those in favor say it will address public anger about the role played by the banks and the economic meltdown. those against it, notably britain's -- britons, say that it will drive talent out of europe. >> the talks took more than 10 months. negotiators managed to clinch the deal despite opposition from the uk. at present, bankers can receive bonuses of as much as 20 times their basic salary. under the new rules, which can come into effect next year, they could be -- capped at one year's salary. >> most important thing is that banks will be stabilized, that a are better able to withstand the crisis -- that they are better able to withstand the crisis. >> it shows we are implementing what we learned from the financial crisis. >> critics say bonuses can encourage bankers to take unjustifiable risks in order to make more money. some say such behavior caused the financial and banking crisis. from now on, banks will also have to hold more capital as a buffer against any future crisis, a move intended to
. i know what that poll is saying, but i think there's a lot of confusion between the euro and the eu sometimes. i know that people think of the eurozone and the eu as sort of the same thing. >> the whole message from the conservative government has been a little confused. it's interesting and we'll play this a little later, but -- >> but they want to stay in the eu if they can negotiate new terms. you punish about there's a split in there because there will be one wing of the party that is essentially we want to stay and he are negotiate. the question comes is if they can't get everything they want, do they then say we tried, but we still better stay? a whole other wing of the party says, if we try and we don't get what we want, then we had better leave. >> and it's interesting. we asked earlier tr week about whether it would be bad for business if britain left the eu. actually, he seemed to say yes. in every the less, i think he serves in some capacity with the government, as well. he hesitated a little bit and says, well, yes, we'll play that tape. >> and how many other people actu
year. >>> and the eu moves to clamp down on big paychecks in the banking sector, looking to cap bonuses on a banker's salary as early as next year. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> okay. we're back. you're mobiled up and we have some data. >> yes. it's such a mobile world, isn't it, in many ways. let's first talk about what's happening with the german unemployment figures. we were waiting on these. it turns out 6.9%, that is the unemployment level for germany in january. the unadjusted figure is 7.4%. it's higher than expected. you can see the forecast was for 6.8%. the prior month was revised higher. the rate itself was unchanged. that's a right i think here in london or certainly in the u.s. they wouldn't mind seeing at this point. >> we've created a million private sector jobs. >> in britain? >> yeah. >> well, congratulations. >> there you go. that is the great conundrum, right? >> it's true. the different between -- well, and even with germany. the liesh market social security holding up, despite the sharp contr
-claude junker says he expects the eu to real a deep on the budget today. juncker said the last of an agreement would be disastrous for the region. julia is in brussels. julia, are we going to get a budget? mr. cameron has said, look, i don't want it frozen, i want it cut. so what's going to happen? >> well, we're moving in the direction of cuts. i think the positive news is that if you compare what we were talking about in november, we've cut around 80 billion euros from the 1 trillion euro target that they were looking at back in november. so we are moving in the right direction, but with regard to the decision today, i think if you've been listening to angela merkel to david cameron himself and francois hollande this week, the indication is that perhaps we shouldn't be as optimistic as jean-claude juncker would have us believe, but someone has to fly the flag for europe and we like our posturing in europe. overall, what rewe looking at? germany, the uk, the nordic european countries are fighting for cuts, real term cuts in this whereas italy and france would rather have it held steady. even
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)